Report Gender Discrimination & Abuse: 0800 007 709
.
Viewing posts categorised under: Press Statement

CGE Welcomes Guilty Verdict for Christopher Panayiotou and Co-Accused

Posted by Immanuel Makonko in Press Statement | 0 comments

To: Editors, Producers and Reporters CGE Welcomes Guilty Verdict for Christopher Panayiotou and Co-Accused The Commission for Gender Equality (CGE) welcomes the guilty verdict handed down to Jayde Panayiotou’s killers, her husband Christopher Panayiotou and two -co-accused. The case once again brings the spotlight to the rampant and endemic surge in intimate partner killings. The Commission is pleased that this verdict will convey a strong message that intimate partner violence, including murder and related crimes have no place in our homes, communities and society in general. The Commission applauds the law enforcement agencies and the justice system for seeing to it that justice was served on behalf of the late Jayde Panayiotou. The Commission believes that the planned and pre-meditated murder of Jayde Panayiotu warrants the harshest sentence possible under the law. The Commission trusts that on the 17 November 2017, nothing less than a lengthy jail sentence will be imposed on the three brutal murderers of Jayde Panayiotu. The CGE is convinced that the justice system and our law enforcement agencies remain our best allies in the fight against gender based violence, intimate partner violence and other related scourges that haunt our society on a daily basis. We remain dismayed that, according to available data, four women are killed each day by their intimate partners. “The CGE commends the police, prosecutorial team and the Judge who acted relentless in pursuit of the truth, justice was served. The Gender Commission is calling for hefty and lengthy sentence to Christopher Panayiotou and his two co-accused. This will send a clear message to those that use violence and threats asset their power against women to settle family dispute that its criminal and they will not continue to remain in our homes, in our streets and our communities!” said the Ms Lulama Nare, the Chairperson of the Commission for Gender Equality. Kreditas dirbantiems užsienyje bei paskolos iš žmonių https://www.superpaskolos.lt/paskolos-is-zmoniu/   ENDS,   Issued by: Commission for Gender Equality (CGE) Date:   06 November 2017 Contact Person: Javu Baloyi Tel: 083 579 3306 The Commission for Gender Equality is established in terms of Section 187 of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa in order to promote respect for gender equality and the protection, development and attainment of gender equality.  

CGE RESPONSE TO THE 2016/17 NATIONAL CRIME STSTISTICS

Posted by Immanuel Makonko in Press Statement | 0 comments

To: Editors, Producers and Reporters CGE RESPONSE TO THE 2016/17 NATIONAL CRIME STSTISTICS On the 24th of October 2017, the South African Police Service (SAPS) under the leadership of Police Minister Fikile Mbalula and the Acting National Commissioner Lieutenant General Lesetja Mothiba, released the 2016/17 national crime statistics, which denote a general 2,4% decline in contact crimes. Below are the contact crime statistics in their various sub-categories:

  • Murder: 19 016 in 2016/17 and 18 673 in 2015/16 (1,8% increase).
  • Sexual Offences: 49 660 in 2016/17 and 51 895 in 2015/16 (4,3% decline).
  • Attempted murder: 18 205 in 2016/17 and 18 127 in 2015/16 (0,4% increase).
  • Assault with intent to do grievous bodily harm: 170 616 in 2016/17 and 182 933 in 2015/16 (6,7% decline).
  • Common assault: 156 450 in 2016/17 and 164 958 in 2015/16 (5,2% decline).
  COMMENTARY – KEY POINTS:
  • On the face of it, the 2016/17 the figures for the category of Sexual Offences show a 4.3% decline (from 51 895 in 2015/16 to 49 660 in 2016/17). However, the statistics for sexual offences are often met with widespread scepticism because the SAPS reports only on cases that were reported and recorded at their police stations during the specified financial year. It is widely acknowledged also that sexual offences crime figures are highly dependent on the reporting behaviours of the victims or those related to them. In other words, the SAPS figures on sexual offences are, at best, a reflection of those incidents that were reported by members of the public, particularly the victims and/or those related to them. Such incidents are well known for being susceptible to underreporting or even non-reporting. This is because many incidents of sexual offences occur within the hidden and private spaces of the family, the household/home or individual relationships, which makes them highly dependent on the private motivations and willingness of those affected and impacted to approach law enforcement agencies to report. In many instances, these incidents remain hidden. Therefore, the SAPS figures cannot possibly reveal the true extent of such hidden crimes. As long as the problem of under-reporting persists and the SAPS continues to rely on citizens to report such incidents, the country might not know the full extent or accurate number of sexual crimes in society.
 
  • The CGE is therefore, not convinced that the reported decline in contact crimes, particularly sexual offences (declined by 4,3%) is a true reflection of the reality of sexual violence against women and girls. In fact, many gender activists have expressed great concern over the decreasing number of reporting in this category of sexual offences, asserting that the decrease in figures could mean that an increasing number of victims of sexual offences are either failing to report to the police or put off/discouraged by the secondary victimisation or the indifferent attitudes of law enforcement officials that the victims often encounter on the ground. In many communities throughout the country, widespread perceptions persist that the police will not be effective in dealing with sexual crimes, thus discouraging reporting. Commentators and gender activists in the country do point out that for every reported rape, at least 9 up to 27 others go unreported.
 
  • Similar challenges raised above apply also in the case of the reported 4% decline in Rape cases (rape is a sub-category of sexual offences). Such a decline might not necessarily mean that there was a decrease in the occurrence of incidents of rape in the country, but a mere reflection of the under-reporting behaviour of those affected and impacted. In other words, the decline could reflect the fact that there are significant obstacles/barriers impacting on the reporting of incidents of sexual crimes in general, including rape.
 
  • Underreporting of rape is believed to be prevalent amongst pre-adolescent children, older women, urban women, illiterate women and sex workers.
 
  • Some of the barriers to the reporting of sexual offences include lack of confidence in the criminal justice system, particularly the police and courts; fear of intimidation by the abuser; fear of not being believed; the desire to avoid the stigma associated with rape; challenges with accessing police stations that are located far away; lack of information/knowledge, etc.
 
  • The sexual offences statistics as reported by SAPS may also fail to depict a clear picture of the extent of sexual violence and its impact in society because they are not disaggregated by gender. While gender based violence (GBV) is not on its own a crime category, South Africa is reportedly one of the leading countries in terms of the scale of GBV globally.
 
  • Furthermore, sexual offences are varied and therefore affect different categories of victims in different ways with different impacts. Accurate information is therefore vital to inform more effective and targeted interventions that will mitigate the scourge of sexual violence against children, women, LGBTIQ communities, sex workers, men who are raped by other men, and women with disabilities. Without such information, it becomes difficult for the CGE, policy makers and other role players to allocate resources appropriately.
 
  • Another critical issue relating to the categorisation of SAPS crime statistics is the need to disaggregate sexual offences to reflect all offences as listed under the Sexual Offences and Related Matters Act 32 of 2007. The current release only disaggregates two sub-categories (rape and sexual assault) under the broader category of Sexual Offences. Other critical sub-categories such as incest, attempted rape and sexual grooming of children are not reflected and figures in this regard are not available. Such information will be critical to illuminate areas of serious concern and guide the necessary processes or interventions and resource allocation to respond effectively.
 
  • According to the Statistics South Africa’s 2016/17 Victims of Crime Survey, the figures for sexual offences stood at 50 883, which differs only marginally with the figure reported by the SAPS (49 660) in their recent statistics release. Nonetheless, it was found that of those 50 883 cases, only 6669 were finalised in courts, and that only 4,780 (10%) of the cases ended in a conviction. This shows that a very large proportion of the cases of sexual offences remain unprocessed, and therefore very few end up successfully prosecuted. This is an important area of concern for the CGE as it implicates not only the slow speed and inefficiency of the justice system in processing these incidents, but also the ineffectiveness of police investigations and their evidence gathering capabilities to lead to successful prosecutions. real6
 
  • Unlike other crime categories, Murder is an exception in that it is not significantly affected by the problem of under-reporting. In general, murders tend to be well recorded with little or no underreporting. The newly released SAPS figures showed 19,016 recorded murders in the 2016/17 financial year, or 343 (1,8% increase) more than in the previous year. This figure, however, also seems to hide gender-related murders (although the CGE is aware that the SAPS does have some of the information related to this.)
 
  • In general, though murder, related figures often do not capture sub-categories of violence perpetrated against some vulnerable groups (e.g. hate crimes towards LGBTIQ community whose murders are barely mentioned in the report). Furthermore, murder crimes known to affect women such as Intimate partner killings and femicide are also usually not highlighted but subsumed under the broader category of murder. According to the Daily Maverick (online news publication), the figures related to the category of murder released by the SAPS include 2,639 women, 574 boys and 265 girls during the year of reporting. The SAPS figures did not reflect these statistics. Such detailed information in the release of the SAPS crime statistics will be vital in the future for the work of the CGE.
   
  • Similarly, the figures on the crime category Assault are subject to similar misgivings as those related to Murder. The Institute for Security Studies (ISS) also cautions against this figure, insisting that official statistics on assault may not reflect reality. Most victims are often related to the perpetrators as in the case of domestic violence and may therefore be less likely to report and/or pursue the course of prosecution for assault.
 
  • In general, though, SAPS statistics revealed a decline in the crime category Common Assault from 164 958 in 2015/16 to 156 450 in 2016/17 (5,2% decline). Similarly, in a related category of Assault with intent to do grievous bodily harm, a decline from 182 933 in 2015/16 to 170 616 in 2016/17 (6,7% decline) was observed. However, as seen with other crime categories the official statistics did not reveal the intricacies of both forms of assault. From a gender perspective, details pertaining to domestic violence are glossed over by the generalized manner of reporting.
  While a decline in the figures related to sexual offences in general and rape, was noted, this is no course for celebration because the SAPS figures remain subject to significant limitations and criticism as indicated above. What this means is the fact that South Africa remains a crime ridden society, with limited capacity (especially in relation to crime intelligence/detection, investigative capacity and prosecutorial efficacy) among law enforcement agencies to make an impact on the levels of crimes, not just reported crimes. These remain areas of concern for the CGE and the CGE raises them annually in response to the release of the SAPS crime statistics. ENDS, Issued by: Commission for Gender Equality (CGE) Date:   05 September 2017 Contact Person: Javu Baloyi Tel: 083 579 3306 The Commission for Gender Equality is established in terms of Section 187 of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa in order to promote respect for gender equality and the protection, development and attainment of gender equality.

Gender Commission congratulates Commission Nare and the Four Commissioners on their appointments

Posted by Immanuel Makonko in Press Statement | 0 comments

To:  Editors, Producers and Reporters Gender Commission congratulates Commission Nare and the Four Commissioners on their appointments The Commission for Gender Equality (CGE) welcomes the announcement by President Jacob Zuma in appointing Commissioner Lulama Nare as the Chairperson of the Commission with immediate effect.   The Commission’ staff, management and other Commissioners congratulate Commissioner Nare on her appointment and wish her success and well in her new leadership role as Chairperson of the Commission. We hope that under her leadership the Commission will continue grow from strength to strength. The Commission also wishes to welcome and congratulate the four additional new Commissioners who were appointed by the President. These are Ms Tamara Eugenia Mathebula, Mr Sediko Daniel Rakolote, Ms Nthabiseng Sepanya Mogale and Ms Nthabiseng Moleko. The Gender Commission welcomes these additional appointments with the firm belief that they will advance and strengthen the work of the Commission in its mandate and to the progressive realisation of creating a society free of gender oppression and gender inequality. The Commission would like to the thank the outgoing Acting Chairperson, Dr. Nondumiso Maphazi for her role in leading the Commission with vigour and commitment. For all parents and employers looking to monitor cell phones of kids and employees using mobile phone monitoring software, SpyPhoneMax is your All-In-One solution, where you can find the best spy phone app on the web for iOS or Android. Look at our latest mobile spy app reviews, explore newest features, prices, and compare terms. SpyPhoneMax helps you to find the best cell phone app in 1 click. Take total control of your mobile! ENDS, Issued by: Commission for Gender Equality (CGE) Date:   23 October 2017 Contact Person: Javu Baloyi Tel: 083 579 3306 The Commission for Gender Equality is established in terms of Section 181 of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa in order to promote respect for gender equality and the protection, development and attainment of gender equality.

CGE welcomes Sipho “Bricks” Ndlovu sentencing

Posted by Immanuel Makonko in Press Statement | 0 comments

Media Release For Immediate Release: 17 October 2017 To: Editors, Producers and Reporters CGE welcomes Sipho “Bricks” Ndlovu sentencing

The Commission for Gender Equality (CGE) welcomes the 15-year sentence handed to Sipho Ndlovu also known as Bricks for raping his niece. The Commission is of the view that the sentence is a clear indication that our justice system wants to curb gender based violence (GBV) in our society. The Commission condemns any kind of violence regardless of the gender of the person who commits it.

Although the Commission welcomes the decision, we are concerned with the continual delays in cases of GBV. It is therefore necessary for our justice system to address those systemic issues that cause cases of this nature to be delayed. The Commission’s court monitoring processes elsewhere in the country have convinced us that the speedy conclusion of GBV cases is important. These delays might affect those that are scheduled to testify and also prevent potential witnesses from coming forward.

The Commission calls upon the police to ensure that there is proper investigation. That the evidence to be led is credible and enough to ensure prosecution of the perpetrators of these heinous crimes. The Commission believes this will help in speedy resolution of gender based violence cases which at best take too long to prosecute due to insufficient evidence.

We once again call on South Africans to join hands as part of the 365 Days of Activism to continue raising awareness and advocating against the scourge of gender based violence. We hope that people will start learning alternative ways of resolving conflicts without resorting to violence. People can use our Toll- Free Number 0800 007 709 to report cases of gender based violence. PrivateFX by Igor Mazepa and Concorde Capital ENDS, Issued by: Commission for Gender Equality (CGE) Date:   17 October 2017 Contact Person: Javu Baloyi Tel: 083 579 3306 The Commission for Gender Equality is established in terms of Section 181 of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa in order to promote respect for gender equality and the protection, development and attainment of gender equality.

Gender Commission outraged at the molestation of learners in Soweto

Posted by Immanuel Makonko in Press Statement | 0 comments

Media Release  For immediate Release: 13 October 2017 To: Producers, Reporters and editors    Gender Commission outraged at the molestation of learners in Soweto   The Commission for Gender Equality (CGE) has learnt with outrage and disgust about the molestation of 83 learners at AB Xuma Primary School in Soweto by a Scholar Patroller.  Through its mandate, the CGE will ensure that it supports and ensure that adequate interventions and responses are put in place by relevant state institutions and other stakeholders to ensure that no such flagrant abuses take place especially against defenceless children in a place of learning.   The CGE has also learnt that the alleged suspect has been apprehended by the police and has appeared before the courts. The CGE applauds the police for moving swiftly in arresting the alleged perpetrator and calls for justice to be served.   The Commission is also particularly worried at the secondary victimisation these learners suffered at the hands of those who were meant to protect them as there is allegation of cover-up by the Principal and Senior Management. The CGE will closely monitor the case as part of its routine court monitoring processes.   The CGE commends MEC Panyaza Lesufi for suspending the school principal and the senior management of the school for failing to act when allegations of abuse were reported to the school management some time ago. The CGE also applauds MEC Lesufi for ensuring that there was pyscho – therapy support for the learners. The CGE also expects MEC Lesufi to hold the School Governing Body (SGB) accountable for not discharging its responsibilities effectively in overseeing the work of the school management in this regard.   The Acting Chairperson of the Commission for Gender Equality, Dr. Nondumiso Maphazi, has this to say about the incident:   “It is with great sadness that we experience yet another horrific case of child molestation in our country. It should be noted that this happens at the time when the CGE is embarking on community outreach programmes and measures to raise public awareness on matters of gender based violence in our society. I would like to encourage stakeholders with specific interest in this matter to work together with the school, the office of MEC Lesufi and relevant law enforcement agencies not only to ensure that the perpetrator is dealt with, but also to ensure greater awareness of the risks of child abuse in our communities in general and our schools in particular”.   Dr. Maphazi further reiterated that: in accordance with section 54 of the Sexual Offences Amendment Act 32 of 2007 there is an obligation on all of us to report acts of sexual offences against children, women and persons who are mentally disabled. Failure to report this is considered an offence punishable by a fine and / or imprisonment. Look at http://pregily.com/ for more information   We urge members of the public with information about acts of gender based violence and abuse of women or children, among others, to call our Toll-Free Number 0800 007 709 to report such cases.   ENDS,   Issued by: Commission for Gender Equality (CGE) Date:   13 October 2017 Contact Person: Javu Baloyi Tel: 083 579 3306 The Commission for Gender Equality is established in terms of Section 181 of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa in order to promote respect for gender equality and the protection, development and attainment of gender equality.

Gender Commission outraged at the senseless and barbaric killing of the De Doorns woman

Posted by Immanuel Makonko in Press Statement | 0 comments

Gender Commission outraged at the senseless and barbaric killing of the De Doorns woman The Commission for Gender Equality (CGE) is concerned with the gruesome murder of a woman by her partner in De Doorns, Western Cape. The senseless and barbaric killing of Laurina Ryk with a shovel by her 25-year-old boyfriend places the spotlight once again not only on intimate partner killings but also on gender based violence that continues unabated in South Africa.  Using a spade to kill a defenceless and vulnerable person should not be tolerated in a society that has embraced a Bill of Rights which espouses respect for dignity, equality and the right to security of every person. Although the Commission is grateful that the administration of justice will act in this matter and justice will most likely be delivered, this brings little comfort to family members who have lost a loved one and more especially the one year old child that will be adversely affected. Laurina’s death and the manner in which she lost her life, allegedly at the hands of her boyfriend is yet another reminder that South Africa is not addressing gender based violence effectively. The CGE has not been silent on GBV which stalks both men and women but more especially our women and girls even in the “sanctuary” of their homes where they are supposed to be protected against harm and violence. In its 2013 Report on the Eradication of Violence Against Women and Children the CGE raised the fact that there is a need for South Africa to move beyond policy development and to initiate meaningful as well as coordinated strategic imperatives that will start reversing GBV. Even if the life of a single Laurina is saved, this would be a signal of victory against GBV because it would mark the beginning of an era where the government of the day is taking the most serious concern of women seriously, namely to heed the call of peace loving South Africans “to go to war against GBV”. In keeping with our Constitutional and Legal Mandate the Commission will be monitoring this case in ensuring that both the accused and the victims receive a fair trial. However, this will definitely not be the end of our commitment towards achieving a society free from all forms of gender oppression and inequality but strengthens our resolve to remind all in positions of authority that the CGE will continue with its initiatives aimed at reversing an abhorrent level of GBV which is wreaking havoc in our lives and our country. The time to act against GBV is now, therefore, the Commission calls upon South Africans to join hands as part of the 365 Days of Activism to continue raising awareness and advocating against the scourge of gender based violence. The Commission condemns any kind of gender based violence committed regardless of the gender of the person who commits it. We hope that people will start learning alternative ways of resolving conflicts as an ethos without resorting to violence. Gunsafesmax.com offers free shipping on best gun cabinets, fire safes, home safe and gun safes from the leading gun safe manufacturers. Shop Gun Safes at GunSafesMax with 10% OFF using promocode "2018MAXSAFE" - buy online best gun safes with free shipping to United States!

People can use our Toll-Free Number 0800 007 709 to report cases of gender based violence.

ENDS, Issued by: Commission for Gender Equality (CGE) Date:   06 September 2017 Contact Person: Javu Baloyi Tel: 083 579 3306 The Commission for Gender Equality is established in terms of Section 187 of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa in order to promote respect for gender equality and the protection, development and attainment of gender equality.

Thembelihle Base’s killing puts back on the spotlight yet another Intimate Partner Killing Case

Posted by Immanuel Makonko in Press Statement | 0 comments

Thembelihle Base’s killing puts back on the spotlight yet another Intimate Partner Killing Case

On 27 August 2017, residents of Manyeyeni Trust, Kabokweni, outside White River in Mpumalanga woke up to a gruesome discovery of a partially decomposed body of Thembelihle Base. Ms Base was reported missing on the 10 August 2017. At the time of her disappearance, Ms Base was seen in the company of a 26-year-old man who was known to her. Her death brings back the spotlight onto the issue of gender based violence, particularly intimate partner violence. In this month focussing on issues affecting women, the Commission for Gender Equality (CGE) has been using various fora or platforms to highlight the worrying and increasing incidents of crime related to gender based violence, particularly intimate partner killings. Most importantly, CGE is engaging men and boys about their role in ending the scourge of gender based violence as they are often the perpetrators of these heinous crimes. The Gender Commission sends condolences to Ms Base’s family and trusts that they would find comfort during these trying times. As part of our Constitutional and Legal Mandate the Commission will be monitoring this case to ensure that justice takes its course. We therefore call upon the community of Manyeyeni to respect the rule of law and trust that the court will administer justice without bias and prejudice. In line with the declaration of the International Conference for Women (ICW) that was hosted by the Parliament of the Republic of South Africa there is a need to accelerate reform and initiatives to address violence against women and its impact on the economic and social empowerment of women. Further strengthen working relations of government; civil society as well as private sector in fighting the increasing human right violation of women and girls. klgirls.net   We once again implore South Africans to join hands as part of the 365 Days of Activism to continue raising awareness and advocating against the scourge of gender based violence. The Commission condemns any kind of gender based violence committed regardless of the gender of the person who commits it. We hope that people will start learning alternative ways of resolving conflicts without resorting to violence.     ENDS, Issued by: Commission for Gender Equality (CGE) Date:   31 August 2017 Contact Person: Javu Baloyi Tel: 083 579 3306 The Commission for Gender Equality is established in terms of Section 187 of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa in order to promote respect for gender equality and the protection, development and attainment of gender equality.  

Gender Commission Hails First Black Woman CEO for BP Southern Africa

Posted by Immanuel Makonko in Press Statement | 0 comments

Gender Commission Hails First Black Woman CEO for BP Southern Africa The Commission for Gender Equality (CGE) wishes to congratulate Ms Bafelelang Priscillah Mabelane, the first Black woman Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of British Petroleum Southern Africa. This appointment will serve as an inspiration for other women provided that similar opportunities are made available by more corporate entities to more experienced and capable women in South Africa.   The CGE is confident that Ms Mabelane’s business experience and leadership qualities, acquired from years of hard work with various companies including ACSA, Vodacom and BP Southern Africa, amongst others, will have prepared her thoroughly for this new and exciting challenge. The Commission, in its report on transformation in the private sector, has decried lack of gender transformation and the limited opportunities when it comes to women ascending to positions of power and influence in the corporate world. The Commission therefore hopes that Ms Mabelane’s appointment heralds a trend that will only intensify going forward rather than remain only an isolated incident.   The Gender Commission will always, if called upon, give the necessary advice and encouragement to corporate and other entities to sustain the momentum towards gender transformation and women’s empowerment in South Africa. It is our belief that other women, in particularly girl children will look at this not as a fulfilment of a dream for Ms Mabelane but a constant reminder that they too can do just that, if not more. Косметика нового поколения от Макса Полякова   ENDS,   Issued by: Commission for Gender Equality (CGE) Date:   30 August 2017 Contact Person: Javu Baloyi Tel: 083 579 3306 The Commission for Gender Equality is established in terms of Section 181 of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa to promote respect for gender equality and the protection, development and attainment of gender equality.  

CGE ALARMED OVER HEIGHTENING STATE OF GENDER BASED VIOLENCE IN SOUTH AFRICA

Posted by Immanuel Makonko in Press Statement | 0 comments

CGE ALARMED OVER HEIGHTENING STATE OF GENDER BASED VIOLENCE IN SOUTH AFRICA   At its quarterly Plenary meeting held on the 16- 18 August, 2017, in Johannesburg, the Commission for Gender Equality (CGE), reflected on a number of recent incidents of violence against women and related issues of concern for the country, and wishes to bring to the attention of   the nation the following:   In the absence of a national strategic plan on gender based violence as well as a national coordinating structure bringing together the efforts of all stakeholders (in government, the private sector and civil society) to promote gender equality, the Commission believes there has sadly been a rolling back of the gains made in the advancement of the gender agenda;   Various studies including the Commission’s studies point to a dire need for a consolidated approach that will be effectively coordinated to address the root causes of these atrocities against women and children in our communities. The Commission in the past three years has conducted numerous research work on national effort/programme to deal with gender based violence. All studies indicate that the country is failing to come up with a coordinated approach to deal with the scourge against gender based violence.   In recent months, we have witnessed a rising tidal wave of gender-based violence, including this month of August in which the country commemorates the rights and historic struggles of women;   Patriarchy remains endemic in our society, permeating the highest levels of leadership even turning those who ordinarily would be expected to be models of gender sensitivity into perpetrators of gender-based violence; ala Deputy Minister of Higher Education Mduduzi Manana, Marks Maponyane etc   The Commission for Gender Equality therefore urges all parties concerned to observe the following points of action:  

  • Government in general must put in place a National Co-ordinating Structure to combat gender-based violence;
 
  • The Ministry of Women in the Presidency must mobilise and re-energise stakeholders within the National Gender Machinery, and other related structures to take lead the fight to end the scourge of gender-based violence;
 
  • The Commission urges all progressive forces in society to develop a programme to collectively mobilise the necessary resources across the country to fight the scourge of gender -based violence.
 
  • That gender based violence work is carried out #365days
   
  • We urge men and boys to stand up in solidarity with other stakeholders in the fight against gender-based violence, to help our communities to combat atrocities against women, children, the elderly, people with disabilities.
 
  • Let this month be the turning point in the struggle for gender justice in South Africa.
 
  • We must ensure that women’s lives are not dominated by fear and insecurity. Many women feel like “the hunted” in their own homes, in their communities and in their workplaces, indeed even in places of worship.
  We have recently observed that it is also a matter of power relations, where more powerful women in positions of leadership, including women who are politically connected, are also capable of committing atrocities against the weak and vulnerable. Après, cette prochaine fois que vous devez acheter Cialis sans ordonnance , visitez seul clinique en droite enregistrée après commandez un nouveau valise en compagnie de pilules à l'égard de tadalafil après unique examen médicale.   The Commission will therefore be seeking an urgent meeting with the Ministry of the Police in South Africa to discuss the role of the police in the Manana case, the Zimbabwean First Lady case and the protection of women, children, LGBTI and men from gender based violence.   The Commission is also concerned about the inconsistencies that arise due to systemic issues in the judicial wherein cases of gender based violence take too long to prosecute in the process the victim suffers secondary victimisation.   It is our collective duty and responsibility as a nation to take whatever steps are necessary to protect the weak, vulnerable and subordinate from the violence perpetrated not only by men, but also by those in positions of power and authority such as the recent saga involving the Zimbabwean First Lady, Madam Grace Mugabe. The Commission’s Constitutional mandate “to promote respect for gender equality and the protection, development and attainment of gender equality” places upon it the burden to ensure that our country observes the right of women to be protected against gender based violence.   Ends,   Issued by: Commission for Gender Equality Tel: 083 579 3306 Enquiries: Javu Baloyi Date: 18 August 2017 The Commission for Gender Equality is established in terms of Section 181 of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa in order to promote respect for gender equality and the protection, development and attainment of gender equality    

Gender Base Violence – Stakeholder and Media Dialogue

Posted by Immanuel Makonko in Press Statement | 0 comments

ARE THE FPB’S CLASSIFICATION GUIDELINES STILL REFLECTIVE OF SOCIETAL NORMS AND VALUES OF THE SOUTH AFRICAN PUBLIC?                                                                                                  Johannesburg, 17 August 2017- The Film and Publication Board (FPB) is undertaking a process of reviewing its current Classification Guidelines to measure whether they are still reflective of South Africa’s societal norms and values. A stakeholder and media dialogue will be hosted at the Birchwood Hotel and Conference Center on the 23rd August 2017, under the theme “Sexual Violence and its prevalence in the media”. The dialogue will be focusing on how exposure to violence, sex and sexual violence in the media impacts on societal norms and values.   “South Africa is rated amongst the worst societies when it comes to violence against women and children. As part of commemorating women’s month, the FPB wants to focus on sexual violence in the media through assessing the prevalence of gender stereotypes and gender based violence in the media,” says Abongile Mashele, FPB’s Acting Chief Operations Officer.   She further states that violence against women does not end with physical violence; other forms of violence including emotional and psychological violence have no visible scars but have long effects on victims and survivors. These can be worsened through constant exposure to similar themes in the media through film and other forms of entertainment media. Furthermore, constant exposure can lead to children being desensitized and normalizing such behavior.   The FPB has partnered with Commission for Gender Equality (CGE) for the dialogues. The partnership stems from the previous classification guidelines review process which introduced the classifiable element of “Sexual Violence (SV)”. The SV classifiable element warns consumers in advance that the content has sexual violence scenes such as rape and physical violence.   The dialogues seeks to kick start the process of reviewing the current Classification Guidelines. Previously, the classification guidelines were reviewed every two years and where there were legal amendments it was revised as deemed necessary. However, the Council of the FPB took the view that norms, values and tolerance levels do not change rapidly over two years. A five year review period was introduced to take into consideration long term changes in cultural norms and values. Play the best website friv games.   ENDS  Gender Based violence - Stakeholder and Media dialogue Issued by: Mr. Sipho Mkhwanazi Digital Content Coordinator 083 573 2543   Enquiries: Ms. Manala Botolo Acting Manager Communications and Public Education 082 860 6748   Notes to the Editor The current classification guidelines were last reviewed in 2012 and subsequently published in October 2014 and have been applied since.   The purpose of the Film and Publication Board (“FPB”) is to inter alia provide consumer advice to enable adults to make informed viewing, reading and gaming choices for both themselves and the children in their care. Furthermore, the FPB is mandated to protect children from exposure to disturbing and harmful materials and from premature exposure to adult experiences.   To this end, the FPB classifies films, interactive computer games and certain publications using the classification guidelines as approved by the Council of the FPB in consultation with the Minister of Communications (“Minister”) pursuant to the provisions of section 4A(1)(a) of the Films and Publications Act 65 of 1996, as amended (“FP Act or the Act”).