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These few strokes, it seems to me, are enough to show what a difficult topic for the first adaptation of classical Lithuanian literature was chosen by the authors of the recently released “This Damned Humility” film by scriptwriter V. Zhilinskaite and director A. Daus.

In the prologue, lyrical shots, full of deep thoughtfulness, are slowly passing before us. (A little ahead, let us say that the film is color and that neither the director, nor the young cameraman J. Tomashevichyus, nor the other members of the film crew, had any prior experience with color.)

Gradually, wariness disappears. As if from deep oblivion, having cleaned up the dust of time, the camera introduces us to Mikolyukas Shukshtu, Geishe, to the North, shows them in the atmosphere of heavy life of the serfs.

How many readers - so many possible adaptations of a work of literature. There is no paradox in this: each of us imagines heroes in his own way. Therefore, it would be better if we agree with the performers offered to our attention without any preconditions: after all, the success of the film adaptation ultimately does not depend on the selection of the acting ensemble on the grounds of external similarity with the characters of a literary work.

The authors of the film chose a work that is distinguished by psychological depth, but lacking clear social and historical characteristics. Let us say at once: in comparison with the literary original, the film loses a great deal in the depths of psychological analysis, but it is obviously striving for social certainty and historical concreteness. The creators of the picture tried by various means to convey the features of the era, the signs of the time of action. Here at the beginning of the film we see a police officer in the chaise, who, hurrying somewhere, whips his charioteer. Immediately from the replica Geisha, we find out the reason for this rush - somewhere there is a war, we guess - the Crimean War. This is a cursory stroke, and, perhaps, not every viewer will have enough of such a definition of the time of action. But here several years pass, and we are already clearly shown how the foundations of serfdom are crumbling in the reformed Lithuania. The scene in the tavern is remembered: the peasants cannot cope with themselves, having learned that they are finally free, and still not understanding what is waiting for them; bitter feeling causes their spontaneous fun. “Ah, freedom, freedom,” the old writer shakes his head contritely, looking at the drunken peasants lying around under the tables on the first morning of freedom. The episode at the church is expressive: for the “terrible sin” a girl and her beloved are tied to the pillory with her bag on her head. The crowd mocks them. Each of the three main characters of the drama is shown here in accordance with the cruel truth about the past sufferings of the people. All this, as well as the attributes of everyday life of the Lithuanian peasantry of the second half of the XIX century, create a reliable atmosphere that emphasizes and explains the nuances of the inner experiences of the heroes.

From the lyrical images, from the correctly noticed details, from the solutions of the main collisions of the film, the thought of that submissiveness, which, from the point of view of our contemporary, cannot be called anything but damned. But this gradually developing image of everlasting humility cannot be overlooked by artistic miscalculations: the slowness of the rhythms gives rise to a contemplative attitude to what is happening, and here I want to blame the scriptwriter and director for the fact that they have deprived us of the opportunity to feel the force of active popular protest. Curses addressed to obedience, sometimes not enough angry, sound passive.

The general mood in the film is lyrical, the film shows noticeable metaphorical thinking. However, the metaphors are “passed through a filter” by the author’s concept; they are not as straightforward and dry as in some other Lithuanian films.

The lyrical flow of the story fully meets the chamber plot of the tape. The drama of love experiences of Geysha, Mikolyukas, Severiy is, of course, the death of the historically doomed social class “uncle and aunt”, but above all this is also a complex range of internal contradictions experienced by the heroes. Before you take levitra, tell doctor if you have any diseases or illnesses, because not could, you are allowed to use levitra, or your doctor may adjust the amount of this drug. Not in levitra take how should viagra if you take nitrates drugs. Cialis (Taladafil) is the third FDA approved drug for erectile dysfunction.